Coronavirus with a baby: what you need to know to prepare and respond

Coronavirus with a baby: what you need to know to prepare and respond

Health & Wellness

16-03-2020

Authors: 

Karleen Gribble – Adjunct Associate Professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Western Sydney University

 – Research Fellow, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney

If you have a baby, you may be worried about them catching the coronavirus, particularly after media reports of an Australian infant diagnosed with it.

The good news is, the evidence so far is babies almost never get seriously ill from the coronavirus. And even if infected, they may have no symptoms. Read More >

Myth busting – Novel Coronavirus

Myth busting – Novel Coronavirus

Health & Wellness

12-02-2020

Posted 10 February 2020 by Better Health Channel Team

 
man blowing his nose in front of computerWhat we know: the facts about novel coronavirus

In late 2019 cases of a novel coronavirus started to be reported. There have been some cases in Victoria, and the Department of Health and Human Services has worked closely with the Victorian health sector, Commonwealth and international agencies to help keep people safe, healthy and informed. Read More >

Like to improve your health in 2020?

Like to improve your health in 2020?

Health & Wellness

06-01-2020

Hoping to improve your health in 2020? If your diet isn’t quite as it could be, a supplement may help.

@sup_supplements target specific concerns for the modern life.

Speak to one of our team to find out if a vitamin supplement might be suitable for you.

📸 pics via SUP Supplements

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Bushfire aftermath – safety tips

Bushfire aftermath – safety tips

Health & Wellness

  • Check with your local emergency services that it is safe to return to your property after a bushfire.
  • Wear protective clothing before entering your property after a bushfire.
  • Where possible, try to avoid taking children onto fire-damaged properties. If you do, make sure they remain protected at all times.
  • Hazardous wastes, such as asbestos materials and burnt CCA-treated timber, need special care during handling and disposal.
 

Houses, sheds and other buildings or structures burnt in a bushfire can leave potential health hazards. These may include fallen or sharp objects, smouldering coals, damaged electrical wires, leaking gas and weakened walls.

When returning to your property, make sure you are aware of the dangers and take steps to protect your health and safety.

 

Hazardous materials that may be present after a bushfire include:

  • asbestos
  • ashes, especially from burnt treated timbers (such as copper chrome arsenate or ‘CCA’)
  • LPG gas cylinders
  • medication
  • garden chemicals
  • farm chemicals
  • other general chemicals (for example, cleaning products)
  • metal and other residues from burnt household appliances
  • dust.

If you have a septic tank, remember it may have been weakened in the fire so do not drive or walk over it.

It is unsafe to spread ash around your property, particularly if asbestos materials were used in your home or other structures, or if CCA-treated timber was burnt. It is also unsafe to disturb the dust when walking around your property.

Use protective clothing to check your property after a bushfire
 

Make sure you wear protective clothing before entering your property, including:

  • Wear sturdy footwear and heavy-duty work gloves.
  • Wear disposable overalls, with long sleeves and trousers.
  • Wear a P2 face mask (P2 face masks are sometimes referred to as N95 masks).
  • When leaving the property, dispose of gloves, coveralls and face masks into a garbage bag. Wash your hands after removing contaminated clothing and articles. Shoes should be cleaned before being worn again.

All foods that have been fire damaged or affected by heat should be discarded. This includes all perishable and non-perishable foods (such as cans or packaged foods). Power outages can also leave perishable foods that may have been refrigerated unsafe to eat.

Bushfires produce large amounts of smoke and ash, and your tank water could have become contaminated from debris and ash, or dead animals. If the water tastes, looks or smells unusual, do not drink it or give it to animals.

Read more here

Never leave kids in cars

Never leave kids in cars

Health & Wellness

30-12-2019

Never leave kids in cars

Never leave your most precious valuables, your children, alone in the car.

The never leave kids in cars campaign prompts parents to take their kids with them whenever they get out of the car, just as they do their everyday valuables, to avoid potentially tragic consequences.

 

The risk of heatstroke and dehydration is very real

  • a child’s body temperature rises three to five times faster than an adults’
  • even on a mild day, the temperature inside a parked car can be 20 to 30 degrees hotter than the temperature outside
  • when it’s 30 degrees outside, a child could be suffering in up to 60-degree heat
  • leaving the windows down has little effect on the inside temperature of the car
  • large cars heat up as quickly as smaller cars.

Visit Kidsafe Victoria for more information.